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Resources => Neuroscience => Topic started by: wonderer on December 14, 2018, 01:40:40 pm

Title: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: wonderer on December 14, 2018, 01:40:40 pm
I'm starting this manxome thread as a place to post scientific findings relevant to philosophy of mind. I may well add new findings at a later date.

First item:  Brainwaves suppress obvious ideas to help us think more creatively. (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/12/181210150622.htm)

Freer thinking, brought to you by physics.
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Wretch on December 16, 2018, 03:27:02 am
Physics doesn't bring anything new to anybody. 
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Gordon Tubbs on December 16, 2018, 06:22:54 pm
A ‘Self-Aware’ Fish Raises Doubts About a Cognitive Test (https://www.quantamagazine.org/a-self-aware-fish-raises-doubts-about-a-cognitive-test-20181212/)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: lucious on December 16, 2018, 11:52:58 pm
 Human thought can voluntarily control neurons in the brain  (https://neurosciencenews.com/human-thought-can-voluntarily-control-neurons-in-brain/)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Pieter on December 18, 2018, 05:48:05 am
Human thought can voluntarily control neurons in the brain  (https://neurosciencenews.com/human-thought-can-voluntarily-control-neurons-in-brain/)

I always find it hilarious how scientists make revolutionary discoveries of what we all know already

Quote
The work, which appears in a paper in the October 28 issue of the journal Nature, shows that “individuals can rapidly, consciously, and voluntarily control neurons deep inside their head,” says Koch, the Lois and Victor Troendle Professor of Cognitive and Behavioral Biology and professor of computation and neural systems at Caltech.

Of course we can! How else do I move my arm??

It's interesting though, how they phrase “The goal was to get patients to control things with their minds” and "HUMAN THOUGHT CAN VOLUNTARILY CONTROL NEURONS IN BRAIN"

Here we have thoughts controlling brains cells, conscious volition. How does this fit into a physicalist paradigm where thoughts are brain cells and volition is a function of the brain? So on that interpretation, brain cells control other brain cells. That sounds like really boring old news.
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Mammal on December 20, 2018, 02:57:57 am
^ Yes, the ability to learn to "control" neurological processes is a neurological process in itself.
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Trinity on December 20, 2018, 03:01:00 am
I'm starting this manxome thread as a place to post scientific findings relevant to philosophy of mind. I may well add new findings at a later date.

First item:  Brainwaves suppress obvious ideas to help us think more creatively. (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/12/181210150622.htm)

Freer thinking, brought to you by physics.

You mean suppressed thinking?
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Trinity on December 20, 2018, 03:05:12 am
A ‘Self-Aware’ Fish Raises Doubts About a Cognitive Test (https://www.quantamagazine.org/a-self-aware-fish-raises-doubts-about-a-cognitive-test-20181212/)

Jordan’s findings have consequently inspired strong feelings in the field. “There are researchers who, it seems, do not want fish to be included in this secret club,” he said. “Because then that means that the [primates] are not so special anymore.”

Elitism within modern academia, once again.
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: hatsoff on December 20, 2018, 03:25:59 am
First item:  Brainwaves suppress obvious ideas to help us think more creatively. (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/12/181210150622.htm)

Cool!
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Pieter on December 20, 2018, 08:06:29 am
^ Yes, the ability to learn to "control" neurological processes is a neurological process in itself.

But why is this such a major discovery?
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Mammal on December 22, 2018, 04:40:42 am
^ Yes, the ability to learn to "control" neurological processes is a neurological process in itself.
But why is this such a major discovery?
I am sure the ability to learn proper mind/neuron control in view of the plasticity of the brain has huge potential. In this case it was for epilepsy, but think about other neurological & psychological abnormalities. Apart from that it is a pretty cool achievement, to visually "map" the control of one's thoughts.
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on December 26, 2018, 09:20:30 am
Simulation shows that bees could count using only a few nerve cells.  (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/12/181221123718.htm)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 11, 2019, 03:05:36 pm
Evidence of quantum consciousness in evoked zero-spin echoes (https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/11/09/219931)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 11, 2019, 03:17:21 pm
Do Quasars Provide Evidence For Free Will? (https://mindmatters.ai/2018/11/do-quasars-provide-evidence-for-free-will/)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 11, 2019, 03:31:50 pm
Quantum calcium-ion interactions with EEG  (http://www.ingber.com/smni18_quantumCaEEG.pdf)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Mammal on January 12, 2019, 04:08:34 am
Do Quasars Provide Evidence For Free Will? (https://mindmatters.ai/2018/11/do-quasars-provide-evidence-for-free-will/)
I find the particular conclusion of this article somewhat confusing. I read about this experiment elsewhere and afaik it involved entangled states with the purpose of determining if and how observation and/or consciousness impact (what are obviously "unaffected") photons. So I don't quite follow how it relates to determinism or free will..?
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 12, 2019, 11:39:32 pm
Can quantum physics help solve the hard problem of consciousness? A hypothesis based on entangled spins and photons  (https://arxiv.org/abs/1809.03490)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 12, 2019, 11:43:16 pm
On the existence of superradiant excitonic states in microtubules (https://arxiv.org/abs/1809.03438)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 12, 2019, 11:51:23 pm
Modeling Human Decision-making: An Overview of the Brussels Quantum Approach (https://arxiv.org/abs/1807.11036)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 12, 2019, 11:53:46 pm
Modelling of consciousness and interpretation of quantum mechanics (https://arxiv.org/abs/1807.07669)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 13, 2019, 12:01:12 am
A quantum uncertainty entails entangled linguistic (https://arxiv.org/abs/1807.03174)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 13, 2019, 11:13:17 am
Quantum approaches to music cognition (https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.07417)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 13, 2019, 11:30:49 am
Making AI Meaningful Again (https://philarchive.org/rec/LANMAM-6)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 14, 2019, 01:10:37 pm
A Theory of Decision Making Based on Feynman's Path Integral Formulation of Quantum Mechanics (https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.12496)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 15, 2019, 01:45:59 pm
Possible superconductivity in brain (https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.05602)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 22, 2019, 09:08:01 am
Mind before matter: reversing the arrow of fundamentality (https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.08594)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 22, 2019, 09:10:39 am
A Quantum Cognition Analysis of Human Behaviour by Hardy's Non-locality Argument (https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.11847)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 22, 2019, 11:38:25 am
The Boy Who Grew a New Brain: Understanding this Miracle from a Neuro-Quantum Perspective (https://philarchive.org/rec/PERTBW)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 22, 2019, 11:40:14 am
Quantum Mechanics of 'Conscious Energy' (https://philarchive.org/rec/RIZQMO-2)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 22, 2019, 11:42:08 am
How Has Quantum Physics Affected the Free Will Debate? (https://philarchive.org/rec/SINHHQ)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on January 31, 2019, 07:38:13 am
Robot that thinks for itself from scratch brings forward rise the self-aware machines (https://finance.yahoo.com/news/robot-thinks-itself-scratch-brings-190000563.html)

Btw, here  (http://robotics.sciencemag.org/content/4/26/eaaw3520) is the abstract of the published article that I believe the Yahoo article is referring to.
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: wonderer on February 01, 2019, 11:31:06 am
Tangential, but interesting...

Psychologists solve mystery of songbird learning (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/01/190131125921.htm)

 "The researchers' clue to the zebra finch mystery came when they considered that birds see the world at several times the "critical flicker fusion rate" of humans. Simply put, birds can perceive events that happen much too fast for a human to see, and most previous research on social learning has not taken into account such rapid "bird time," in which tiny behaviors can have large social effects.

Using slowed-down video, the Cornell researchers were able to identify tiny movements, imperceptible to the human eye, made by the female zebra finches to encourage the baby songbirds. These included wing gestures and "fluff-ups," an arousal behavior in which the bird fluffs up its feathers.

"Over time, the female guides the baby's song toward her favorite version. There's nothing imitative about it," said Carouso-Peck. "
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on February 01, 2019, 02:17:19 pm
Quorum sensing: a quantum perspective (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5055505/#!po=2.00000)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: wonderer on February 06, 2019, 12:45:10 pm
Morals versus money: How we make social decisions (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190206091426.htm)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Lennon on February 06, 2019, 05:05:37 pm
Human Mind control of rat cyborg.

Love to see how dualists deal with this one!

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-36885-0
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on February 12, 2019, 10:30:05 pm
IBM's AI program named "Debater" debates top-ranked human debater (https://www.cnet.com/news/ibms-ai-loses-to-human-debater-but-remains-persuasive-technology/)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: wonderer on February 13, 2019, 12:15:43 am
Consciousness rests on the brain's ability to sustain rich dynamics of neural activity (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190212104217.htm)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: wonderer on May 30, 2019, 06:43:18 pm
Hey Harvey,

Knowing your interest in a correlation between atheism and autism, I thought you might find this (non-paywalled) article (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2677578/) interesting.  It brings up some things that I can see as being of some relevance, and that I see as credible.

It is a study of savantism, and the possibility of inducing savant abilities in neurotypical individuals.  It does discuss autism a fair bit along the way though.

ABSTRACT

I argue that savant skills are latent in us all. My hypothesis is that savants have privileged access to lower level, less-processed information, before it is packaged into holistic concepts and meaningful labels. Owing to a failure in top-down inhibition, they can tap into information that exists in all of our brains, but is normally beyond conscious awareness. This suggests why savant skills might arise spontaneously in otherwise normal people, and why such skills might be artificially induced by low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. It also suggests why autistic savants are atypically literal with a tendency to concentrate more on the parts than on the whole and why this offers advantages for particular classes of problem solving, such as those that necessitate breaking cognitive mindsets. A strategy of building from the parts to the whole could form the basis for the so-called autistic genius. Unlike the healthy mind, which has inbuilt expectations of the world (internal order), the autistic mind must simplify the world by adopting strict routines (external order).
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Harvey on May 30, 2019, 11:48:21 pm
Hm. I'll try to check it out. Have you watched Jeopardy lately? James Holzhauer has clobbered everyone in his way and seems to me to have savant-like abilities. What I find interesting is in his daily double bets he will wager really odd amounts. Maybe there's some reason for it.

Anyway... if anyone wants to discuss savants, Jeopardy, James Holtzhauer please create a thread that is 142 words long with no more than 984 letters. This thread is for publications and papers on mind related topics. Thank you for your courtesy.
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: wonderer on May 31, 2019, 12:17:36 am
Hm. I'll try to check it out. Have you watched Jeopardy lately? James Holzhauer has clobbered everyone in his way and seems to me to have savant-like abilities. What I find interesting is in his daily double bets he will wager really odd amounts. Maybe there's some reason for it.

Anyway... if anyone wants to discuss savants, Jeopardy, James Holtzhauer please create a thread that is 142 words long with no more than 984 letters. This thread is for publications and papers on mind related topics. Thank you for your courtesy.

I haven't watched.  I'll try to remember to check it out while Holtzhauer is still on, but I have the most basic cable, and it seems like the channels I get decreases monthly.
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: wonderer on August 27, 2019, 12:07:42 pm
Spontaneous brain fluctuations influence risk-taking (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/08/190826150704.htm)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: wonderer on August 27, 2019, 12:35:37 pm
Some very cool tech (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/08/190827101605.htm)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: SolidStateDevice on April 05, 2020, 12:01:51 pm
I would be very careful in interpreting these results. Self-awareness is not necessarily the same as consciousness. It's possible that an animal or reptile or certain creatures to know what they are or recognize patterns. This isn't consciousness. Consciousness is the ability to know that I exist, I am a person. I have rational thought. I have free will. Other people are conscious as well. I can recognize that. Humans are the only creatures who have consciousness.
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: PhilosophicalApologetics on April 10, 2020, 02:39:26 pm
Common sence dos not get us anywhere. Every hypothesis must be testet before it can be concidered knowledge. However ir this particular part of the bain was already well researched then it seem silly.

Human thought can voluntarily control neurons in the brain  (https://neurosciencenews.com/human-thought-can-voluntarily-control-neurons-in-brain/)

I always find it hilarious how scientists make revolutionary discoveries of what we all know already

Quote
The work, which appears in a paper in the October 28 issue of the journal Nature, shows that “individuals can rapidly, consciously, and voluntarily control neurons deep inside their head,” says Koch, the Lois and Victor Troendle Professor of Cognitive and Behavioral Biology and professor of computation and neural systems at Caltech.

Of course we can! How else do I move my arm??

It's interesting though, how they phrase “The goal was to get patients to control things with their minds” and "HUMAN THOUGHT CAN VOLUNTARILY CONTROL NEURONS IN BRAIN"

Here we have thoughts controlling brains cells, conscious volition. How does this fit into a physicalist paradigm where thoughts are brain cells and volition is a function of the brain? So on that interpretation, brain cells control other brain cells. That sounds like really boring old news.
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: wonderer on April 27, 2020, 01:52:54 pm
Scientists unveil how general anesthesia works (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/04/200427125200.htm)
Title: Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
Post by: Tom Paine on July 06, 2020, 03:13:41 pm
Do Quasars Provide Evidence For Free Will? (https://mindmatters.ai/2018/11/do-quasars-provide-evidence-for-free-will/)

How random effects on decisions would be any more free than determined ones is something I still don't see.