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Apologetics and Theology

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carter smith

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Dale B. Martin, Yale - Bible Lectures
« on: February 27, 2012, 11:23:49 am »
But God doesn't exist.  How does that affect your arguments?

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carter smith

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Dale B. Martin, Yale - Bible Lectures
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2012, 03:01:48 pm »
It's quite amazing what you can learn from an unbiased source who has not religious ax to grind.  I wonder why they don't teach a more honest view of modern scholarship on the Bible in churches?  Why do they have to lie and skew so much?  It's not like a little pinch of Faith can't make all the contradictions go away, after all.
But God doesn't exist.  How does that affect your arguments?

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carter smith

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Dale B. Martin, Yale - Bible Lectures
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2012, 03:05:29 pm »
Interesting lecture:

From: YaleCourses | Sep 2, 2009  | 23,349 views
Introduction to New Testament (RLST 152)

It is obvious that certain narratives in the New Testament contradict each other and cannot be woven into a historically coherent whole. How, then, do scholars construct who the "historical Jesus" was? There are several principles that historical Jesus researchers follow, which include considering data that 1) has multiple attestations and 2) is dissimilar to a text's theological tendencies as more likely to be historical. Using the modern methods of historical research, it becomes possible to construct a "historical Jesus."

00:00 - Chapter 1. Contradictory Accounts in the New Testament
13:25 - Chapter 2. Finding History in the New Testament
26:27 - Chapter 3. Methods of Historical Jesus Research
47:53 - Chapter 4. Who Was the Historical Jesus?

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
But God doesn't exist.  How does that affect your arguments?