False Entity

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Re: The Philosophical Implications of Demon Possession
« Reply #15 on: August 27, 2013, 10:54:43 pm »
Unsure, I'm currently reading a book called '23 minutes in hell', which talks a little bit about this (I believe) towards the end. I'll let you know f anything relevant comes up.

I believe I read that around 3 years ago. It's an interesting book, but I'm skeptical because it is too.. Unbiblical (similar to the medieval depiction if Hell) I don't see his vision reflecting what the text says at all. Take everything with a grain of salt I suppose. :)

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OrdinaryClay

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Re: The Philosophical Implications of Demon Possession
« Reply #16 on: August 28, 2013, 01:00:09 am »
Quote
Suppose we find countless cases of putative demon possession, and suppose we have no naturalistic explanations for many or almost all these cases...

Are there ANY documented cases that can't be easily explained by some natural phenomena (like schizophrenia or multiple personality disorder)?
Possession
AMONG THE MANY COUNTERFEITS A Case of Demonic Possession
http://www.newoxfordreview.org/article.jsp?did=0308-gallagher

Richard E. Gallagher, M.D., is a board-certified psychiatrist in private practice in Hawthorne, New York, and Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at New York Medical College. He is also on the faculties of the Columbia University Psychoanalytic Institute and a Roman Catholic seminary. He is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Princeton University, magna cum laude in Classics, and trained in Psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Gallagher is the only American psychiatrist to have been a consistent U.S. delegate to the International Association of Exorcists, and has addressed its plenary session
"Strive to enter through the narrow door; for many, I tell you, will seek to enter and will not be able.(Luk 13:24)
So have I become your enemy by telling you the truth?(Gal 4:16)

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OrdinaryClay

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Re: The Philosophical Implications of Demon Possession
« Reply #17 on: August 28, 2013, 01:07:06 am »
I think the biggest philosophical implication, for the theist, would be related to free will.  If you have a worldview where you think God grants each and every one of us free will, and won't interfere with it, then how do you square that with Him allowing demons to interfere with it?
The same way we square other human free willed entities influencing other free willed human entities.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2013, 01:09:13 am by OrdinaryClay »
"Strive to enter through the narrow door; for many, I tell you, will seek to enter and will not be able.(Luk 13:24)
So have I become your enemy by telling you the truth?(Gal 4:16)

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OrdinaryClay

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Re: The Philosophical Implications of Demon Possession
« Reply #18 on: August 28, 2013, 01:17:43 am »
Watch episode 1.6 of the SyFy show Paranormal Witness for a well documented case of demonic oppression. It's called "The Rain Main". There are multiple witnesses including two police officers who were called to the scene and a prison wardon. It's pretty compelling. It's on Netflix if you have that.

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=paranormal+witness+rainman

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paranormal_Witness#Episodes
"Strive to enter through the narrow door; for many, I tell you, will seek to enter and will not be able.(Luk 13:24)
So have I become your enemy by telling you the truth?(Gal 4:16)

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GRWelsh

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Re: The Philosophical Implications of Demon Possession
« Reply #19 on: August 29, 2013, 09:33:51 am »
This thread reminded me of the movie, "The Exorcism of Emily Rose."  It's a pretty good movie, because it leaves it ambiguous to the viewer if the possession really happened, or if it was just some unexplained natural phenomena similar to a combination of epilepsy and psychosis.  In my opinion, the movie comes down more on the supernatural side, but still leaves it open for the other interpretation.  It asks a lot of the same questions I posed earlier in the thread, such as: who gets possessed, and why does God allow it?  The movie answers are: people who are highly spiritually sensitive are more susceptible to being contacted and possessed by demons, and God allows it so that people on earth can have evidence of the spiritual realm.  I found the latter answer very unsatisfying, because it just raises the follow up question: cannot God provide evidence of the spiritual realm that is equally compelling, but isn't horribly victimizing an innocent person?

My favorite element of the movie was that the characterization went beyond simple stereotyping.  Laura Linney's character was an agnostic and skeptic, yet not dogmatically so; Tom Wilkerson as the priest was intelligent, calm and seemingly very trustworthy; and Campbell Scott played the prosecutor who, although a church-going Methodist, was completely disdainful of the supernatural explanations of demon possession and the Catholic exorcism.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2013, 09:37:47 am by GRWelsh »
The morning sun rose and burned off the ghosts; it seems they were nothing but shapes in the fog.

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wonderer

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Re: The Philosophical Implications of Demon Possession
« Reply #20 on: August 29, 2013, 07:38:04 pm »
This thread reminded me of the movie, "The Exorcism of Emily Rose."  It's a pretty good movie, because it leaves it ambiguous to the viewer if the possession really happened, or if it was just some unexplained natural phenomena similar to a combination of epilepsy and psychosis.  In my opinion, the movie comes down more on the supernatural side, but still leaves it open for the other interpretation.  It asks a lot of the same questions I posed earlier in the thread, such as: who gets possessed, and why does God allow it?  The movie answers are: people who are highly spiritually sensitive are more susceptible to being contacted and possessed by demons, and God allows it so that people on earth can have evidence of the spiritual realm.  I found the latter answer very unsatisfying, because it just raises the follow up question: cannot God provide evidence of the spiritual realm that is equally compelling, but isn't horribly victimizing an innocent person?

My favorite element of the movie was that the characterization went beyond simple stereotyping.  Laura Linney's character was an agnostic and skeptic, yet not dogmatically so; Tom Wilkerson as the priest was intelligent, calm and seemingly very trustworthy; and Campbell Scott played the prosecutor who, although a church-going Methodist, was completely disdainful of the supernatural explanations of demon possession and the Catholic exorcism.

I appreciate the review.  I wouldn't otherwise have even considered watching it, but it sounds worth a watch.

Edit:  Actually I wouldn't have even bothered checking out this thread, except that I noticed that you were the last poster.  So thanks for making it worth my time.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2013, 07:41:53 pm by wonderer »
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