Mike Burke

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Is Dr. William Lane Craig the first thinker to suggest that there is both a temporal and an atemporal dimension to God (or that He somehow exists atemporally sans creation, and temporally in creation)?

 

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Mike Burke

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Re: Historical context of Dr. Craig's theory regarding God's relation to time.
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2015, 05:29:24 pm »
Does anyone know what Karl Barth meant when he said this?

“While it is beyond our comprehension that eternity should meet us in time, yet it is true because in Jesus Christ eternity has become time.”

Could he have been suggesting something similar to what Dr. Craig has suggested (i.e. about God being both temporal and atemporal)?

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Mike Burke

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Re: Historical context of Dr. Craig's theory regarding God's relation to time.
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2015, 05:52:47 pm »
And what do you make of this?

Quote
...an understanding of earthly time begins with the
assumption of God’s nature as one in which his eternity includes the possibil-
ity of creation’s temporality. Our time is strictly created time and subordinate
to the true eternity which ‘includes this possibility… and potentiality of time’.7
As a consequence, eternity neither opposes nor negates creation’s temporality:
the possibility of creation’s temporality is contained within the being of God.
This is characteristic of the supremacy of God and the ousia of the Trinity that
permeates Barth’s notion of eternity. From his study of Paul’s letter to the
Romans, Barth had come to comprehend God as infinite, ‘other’ and distinct
from creation and Barth’s theology views all aspects of the created order,
including time and space, as having their source and origin in God...
The incarnation is commonly perceived as God’s taking upon himself a human
form and sharing humanity with his creatures. However, seen from the per-
spective of God’s eternity, the incarnation becomes, alternatively, Christ’s tak-
ing upon himself our temporality: that which is eternal becomes that which is
temporal. In Christ, God takes time to himself ‘permitting created time to
become and be the form of his eternity’.8 That created temporality can be taken
up into God’s eternity implies that time can conform to the shape of eternity
and eternity to the shape of time. The incarnation may thus be viewed as the
fulfilment of creation: God’s nature is that of a self-revealing God and eternity
is, by nature, formed so as to make our temporality a part of itself. God ‘raises
time to a form of his own eternal being’.9 He allows created time to become the
form of his eternity. The idea of God as purely timeless is contradicted by the
sharing of Jesus in our temporality when ‘God himself took time and made it
his own.’
https://www.scienceandchristianbelief.org/serve_pdf_free.php?filename=SCB+21-2+Martin.pdf