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Presumption of Atheism

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searcherman

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Flint's definitions of Atheism
« on: December 07, 2016, 03:45:49 pm »
Here is another wording of Christian apologist Robert Flint's definitions of atheism, in his published lectures, Anti-Theistic Theories. These definitions were the gold standard, despite Flint's hyperbole about "fable" and "delusion", until its obfuscation by latter day atheists and apologists.
https://books.google.com/books?id=SNFZAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA4&dq=flint+antitheistic+theories+atheism&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjwwaiDgePQAhUUV2MKHakRAmAQ6AEIHDAA#v=onepage&q=flint%20antitheistic%20theories%20atheism&f=false
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Atheism is the rejection of belief in God. It teaches either that there is no God, or that it is impossible for man to know that there is a God, or that there is no sufficient reason for believing that there is a God. In other words, it either absolutely denies that there is a Divine Being, or it denies that the human mind is capable of discovering whether or not there is a Divine Being, or it simply maintains that no valid proof of the existence of a Divine Being has been produced. Atheism in the form of a denial of the existence of a God has been called dogmatic atheism; atheism in the form of doubt of man's ability to ascertain whether there is a God or not has been called sceptical atheism; atheism in the form of mere rejection of the evidence which has been presented for the existence of a God may be called critical atheism. There is no individual system of atheism, however, which is exclusively dogmatic, exclusively sceptical, or exclusively critical. These terms express accurately only ideal distinctions which have never been exactly realised. Sceptical atheism and critical atheism are inseparable. A purely dogmatic atheism would be utterly incredible. Sceptical atheism and critical atheism have always been much more prevalent than dogmatic atheism. In every form—even in its most modest form— atheism pronounces all belief in God a delusion, and all religion a fable. What is called practical atheism is not a kind of thought or opinion, but a mode of life. It may coexist with a belief in the being of a God. It is the living as if there were no God, whether we believe that there is a God or not.
Religion is the general theory of this world, its encyclopaedic compendium, its logic in popular form, its spiritual point d’honneur, its enthusiasm, its moral sanction, its solemn complement, and its universal basis of consolation and justification.- K. Marx, Critique of Hegel’s Philosophy of Right

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Re: Flint's definitions of Atheism
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2016, 07:36:37 pm »
What's the difference between the second one and agnosticism?

I think a third option is the most healthy one. Though I also admit that given how god is defined it probably won't be ever possible to prove his existence to reasonable extent. Even if I died, and met Jesus in Heaven or Lucifer in hell I would still be justified in atheistic belief. Maybe some powerful cosmic beings designed it all and gave us hints in form of holy books etc? Maybe matrix... Sufficiently advanced being would be completely indistinguishable from god. Even if I was a firm believer in christianity or islam I could still do that while technically remaning an atheist. At the moment the only difference between a person who beleive in god and a person who believes in powerful aliens is that the second one usually claims god has infinite properties, he can do everything that can be done, knows everything, can be everywhere etc. If at least one of omnis doesn't exist then no one really think of such being as of god.
You see a grammar or spelling error in my post? Feel free to point it out, I'm still learning.

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searcherman

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Re: Flint's definitions of Atheism
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2016, 07:35:01 am »
I don't believe there is a difference between the second category and naturalistic agnosticism. I have found evidence that Flint and his contemporaries considered Huxley to be a "practical atheist". They also adopted the term, agnosticism, as very old, and an epistemology that spans beliefs. But they regarded Huxley's refinement of Freethought as definitely atheistic.
Religion is the general theory of this world, its encyclopaedic compendium, its logic in popular form, its spiritual point d’honneur, its enthusiasm, its moral sanction, its solemn complement, and its universal basis of consolation and justification.- K. Marx, Critique of Hegel’s Philosophy of Right