Harvey

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Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
« Reply #30 on: January 31, 2019, 07:38:13 am »
Robot that thinks for itself from scratch brings forward rise the self-aware machines

Btw, here is the abstract of the published article that I believe the Yahoo article is referring to.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2019, 07:46:56 am by Harvey »

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wonderer

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Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
« Reply #31 on: February 01, 2019, 11:31:06 am »
Tangential, but interesting...

Psychologists solve mystery of songbird learning

 "The researchers' clue to the zebra finch mystery came when they considered that birds see the world at several times the "critical flicker fusion rate" of humans. Simply put, birds can perceive events that happen much too fast for a human to see, and most previous research on social learning has not taken into account such rapid "bird time," in which tiny behaviors can have large social effects.

Using slowed-down video, the Cornell researchers were able to identify tiny movements, imperceptible to the human eye, made by the female zebra finches to encourage the baby songbirds. These included wing gestures and "fluff-ups," an arousal behavior in which the bird fluffs up its feathers.

"Over time, the female guides the baby's song toward her favorite version. There's nothing imitative about it," said Carouso-Peck. "
"The world needed that of us, to maintain—by our example, by our very existence—a world that would keep learning and questioning, that would remain free in thought, inquiry, and word." - Alice Dreger


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wonderer

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"The world needed that of us, to maintain—by our example, by our very existence—a world that would keep learning and questioning, that would remain free in thought, inquiry, and word." - Alice Dreger

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Lennon

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Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
« Reply #34 on: February 06, 2019, 05:05:37 pm »
Human Mind control of rat cyborg.

Love to see how dualists deal with this one!

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-36885-0


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wonderer

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"The world needed that of us, to maintain—by our example, by our very existence—a world that would keep learning and questioning, that would remain free in thought, inquiry, and word." - Alice Dreger

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wonderer

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Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
« Reply #37 on: May 30, 2019, 06:43:18 pm »
Hey Harvey,

Knowing your interest in a correlation between atheism and autism, I thought you might find this (non-paywalled) article interesting.  It brings up some things that I can see as being of some relevance, and that I see as credible.

It is a study of savantism, and the possibility of inducing savant abilities in neurotypical individuals.  It does discuss autism a fair bit along the way though.

ABSTRACT

I argue that savant skills are latent in us all. My hypothesis is that savants have privileged access to lower level, less-processed information, before it is packaged into holistic concepts and meaningful labels. Owing to a failure in top-down inhibition, they can tap into information that exists in all of our brains, but is normally beyond conscious awareness. This suggests why savant skills might arise spontaneously in otherwise normal people, and why such skills might be artificially induced by low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. It also suggests why autistic savants are atypically literal with a tendency to concentrate more on the parts than on the whole and why this offers advantages for particular classes of problem solving, such as those that necessitate breaking cognitive mindsets. A strategy of building from the parts to the whole could form the basis for the so-called autistic genius. Unlike the healthy mind, which has inbuilt expectations of the world (internal order), the autistic mind must simplify the world by adopting strict routines (external order).
"The world needed that of us, to maintain—by our example, by our very existence—a world that would keep learning and questioning, that would remain free in thought, inquiry, and word." - Alice Dreger

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Harvey

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Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
« Reply #38 on: May 30, 2019, 11:48:21 pm »
Hm. I'll try to check it out. Have you watched Jeopardy lately? James Holzhauer has clobbered everyone in his way and seems to me to have savant-like abilities. What I find interesting is in his daily double bets he will wager really odd amounts. Maybe there's some reason for it.

Anyway... if anyone wants to discuss savants, Jeopardy, James Holtzhauer please create a thread that is 142 words long with no more than 984 letters. This thread is for publications and papers on mind related topics. Thank you for your courtesy.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2019, 11:49:54 pm by Harvey »

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wonderer

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Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
« Reply #39 on: May 31, 2019, 12:17:36 am »
Hm. I'll try to check it out. Have you watched Jeopardy lately? James Holzhauer has clobbered everyone in his way and seems to me to have savant-like abilities. What I find interesting is in his daily double bets he will wager really odd amounts. Maybe there's some reason for it.

Anyway... if anyone wants to discuss savants, Jeopardy, James Holtzhauer please create a thread that is 142 words long with no more than 984 letters. This thread is for publications and papers on mind related topics. Thank you for your courtesy.

I haven't watched.  I'll try to remember to check it out while Holtzhauer is still on, but I have the most basic cable, and it seems like the channels I get decreases monthly.
"The world needed that of us, to maintain—by our example, by our very existence—a world that would keep learning and questioning, that would remain free in thought, inquiry, and word." - Alice Dreger

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wonderer

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wonderer

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"The world needed that of us, to maintain—by our example, by our very existence—a world that would keep learning and questioning, that would remain free in thought, inquiry, and word." - Alice Dreger

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Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
« Reply #42 on: April 05, 2020, 12:01:51 pm »
I would be very careful in interpreting these results. Self-awareness is not necessarily the same as consciousness. It's possible that an animal or reptile or certain creatures to know what they are or recognize patterns. This isn't consciousness. Consciousness is the ability to know that I exist, I am a person. I have rational thought. I have free will. Other people are conscious as well. I can recognize that. Humans are the only creatures who have consciousness.

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Re: Interesting scientific finding(s) relevant to philosophy of mind.
« Reply #43 on: April 10, 2020, 02:39:26 pm »
Common sence dos not get us anywhere. Every hypothesis must be testet before it can be concidered knowledge. However ir this particular part of the bain was already well researched then it seem silly.

Human thought can voluntarily control neurons in the brain

I always find it hilarious how scientists make revolutionary discoveries of what we all know already

Quote
The work, which appears in a paper in the October 28 issue of the journal Nature, shows that “individuals can rapidly, consciously, and voluntarily control neurons deep inside their head,” says Koch, the Lois and Victor Troendle Professor of Cognitive and Behavioral Biology and professor of computation and neural systems at Caltech.

Of course we can! How else do I move my arm??

It's interesting though, how they phrase “The goal was to get patients to control things with their minds” and "HUMAN THOUGHT CAN VOLUNTARILY CONTROL NEURONS IN BRAIN"

Here we have thoughts controlling brains cells, conscious volition. How does this fit into a physicalist paradigm where thoughts are brain cells and volition is a function of the brain? So on that interpretation, brain cells control other brain cells. That sounds like really boring old news.

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wonderer

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"The world needed that of us, to maintain—by our example, by our very existence—a world that would keep learning and questioning, that would remain free in thought, inquiry, and word." - Alice Dreger