Did the Eternal Word (second person of the Trinity) merge with a newly created human mind, will, and emotions that did not exist before?

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jayceeii

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Did the Eternal Word (second person of the Trinity) merge with a newly created human mind, will, and emotions that did not exist before?
You seem to be going farther than any Christian has in history, wondering about the exact mechanism of the Incarnation. Honestly, they don't ask this question, and the reason is that in essence they remain thinking solidly of Jesus as a man, words in their liturgy to the contrary not sinking in more than a few micrometers. For Christians it has been enough to say, “Jesus was fully God and fully man,” though as you point out immediate existential questions should pop up, what does that mean and how is it done?

It's an important question, because if Jesus is “fully man,” there's no guarantee of salvation through him. The creatures can only be saved by God, not by another creature—and this includes the angels. Despite vague ideas about a “soul,” the Christian idea is that God became the body of Jesus, that Jesus was his body, and that to have a human body is to be a man. Instead they should be leaning forward to try to understand spirit of various categories can “take on” a body, be it a created soul or the Lord.

Jesus said little overtly about this, but the disciples help us here, presenting Jesus reverently in the Gospel accounts as someone distinct, apart, and different from a man. Examined carefully, the form of Jesus' discourse is also different from discourse generated by any creature, though it requires subtle discrimination to observe this. It seems inevitable to me that the God who made and sustains this world, has the capacity to take on a human body and stride around on it. Seeing this is bad news for the Christians, because their doctrine forbids Jesus from appearing in the way He proved He could appear.

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Maxximiliann

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Did the Eternal Word (second person of the Trinity) merge with a newly created human mind, will, and emotions that did not exist before?

Elvis is dead.
The Earth is not flat.
The Holocaust actually happened.

There are four lights.
The sun does not revolve around the Earth.
Weed makes people violent.
A fetus is a person.

Obama was not born in Kenya.
Gradualism (Evolution) is a lie.
Unicorns of legend aren't real.
The Apollo 11 really did land on the moon.

If you were born with a "twig and berries" you're male otherwise you're female.
Fanatics are irrational.
Little boys are raped by gays.
Abiogenesis is a lie.

1. Jesus was a man. (1 Timothy 2:5; Romans 5:15)
2. His name literally means Jehovah Is Salvation.
3. He ceased to exist when murdered. (1 Corinthians 15:3)
4. God has always existed. (Habakkuk 1:12)
5. God gave Jesus life. (Acts 2:32; Galatians 1:1)
Therefore, Jesus is not God.

No one is entitled to their own version of reality.

1+1+1=3 NOT 1

"Look out: perhaps there may be someone who will carry ​YOU​ off as his prey through the philosophy and empty deception according to the tradition of men, according to the elementary things of the world and not according to Christ." - Colossians 2:8

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jayceeii

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Did the Eternal Word (second person of the Trinity) merge with a newly created human mind, will, and emotions that did not exist before?

1. Jesus was a man. (1 Timothy 2:5; Romans 5:15)
2. His name literally means Jehovah Is Salvation.
3. He ceased to exist when murdered. (1 Corinthians 15:3)
4. God has always existed. (Habakkuk 1:12)
5. God gave Jesus life. (Acts 2:32; Galatians 1:1)
Therefore, Jesus is not God.

No one is entitled to their own version of reality.
The louder humans proclaim, “Jesus was a man,” the louder they are proclaiming, “We have no guarantee of eternal life.” Christian theory is shockingly devoid of any significant ideation about the mechanism of the Incarnation. Particularly after DNA was discovered, it should be obvious to everyone that saying “Son of God” must be close to completely meaningless, since God is spirit. The ideal of “Son of God” appears intended to invoke human pride, as the family is presumed to hold the greatest meaning in living.

But with no mechanisms, we don’t understand the source of Jesus’ authority. The overall appearance through Christian ideation is that the Holy Spirit is running everything, and Jesus was somehow a special case among humans. Yet, the doctrine of the Trinity is there too, as if someone knew differently, insisting that Jesus was of God, and that Jesus was an aspect of God. If God could not embody, the Holy Spirit would be running everything. Then we would not have a Trinity, but a twofold God, with no one to speak of “Father.”

To hear that Jesus was literally God does not sound exciting to humans; in fact it invokes ideas of hatred and persecution, as in the referenced post. This is perhaps due to jealousy, as men pride themselves as being center of the universe, not really wanting to allow an authority to appear from above to give them directions. That one in a human body can have the authority of God, can also be a dangerous idea in early history, where humans are prone to rise as pretenders, and other humans follow them, unable to see that they lie.