Did the Eternal Word (second person of the Trinity) merge with a newly created human mind, will, and emotions that did not exist before?

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jayceeii

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Did the Eternal Word (second person of the Trinity) merge with a newly created human mind, will, and emotions that did not exist before?
You seem to be going farther than any Christian has in history, wondering about the exact mechanism of the Incarnation. Honestly, they don't ask this question, and the reason is that in essence they remain thinking solidly of Jesus as a man, words in their liturgy to the contrary not sinking in more than a few micrometers. For Christians it has been enough to say, “Jesus was fully God and fully man,” though as you point out immediate existential questions should pop up, what does that mean and how is it done?

It's an important question, because if Jesus is “fully man,” there's no guarantee of salvation through him. The creatures can only be saved by God, not by another creature—and this includes the angels. Despite vague ideas about a “soul,” the Christian idea is that God became the body of Jesus, that Jesus was his body, and that to have a human body is to be a man. Instead they should be leaning forward to try to understand spirit of various categories can “take on” a body, be it a created soul or the Lord.

Jesus said little overtly about this, but the disciples help us here, presenting Jesus reverently in the Gospel accounts as someone distinct, apart, and different from a man. Examined carefully, the form of Jesus' discourse is also different from discourse generated by any creature, though it requires subtle discrimination to observe this. It seems inevitable to me that the God who made and sustains this world, has the capacity to take on a human body and stride around on it. Seeing this is bad news for the Christians, because their doctrine forbids Jesus from appearing in the way He proved He could appear.